Publications

The Nazi-Fascist New Order for European Culture

“This revelatory book maps a virtually undiscovered aspect of Europe under Nazi and Fascist hegemony: the attempt to create pan-European cultural institutions for film, music, and literature. This enterprise required a redefinition of what ‘Europe’ meant for the Nazis, the Fascists, and for the extreme right in virtually every European country. Martin’s transnational approach is without doubt a major contribution to a new generation of scholarship about fascism and modernity.”

—Anson Rabinbach, Princeton University

"narrated with great erudition and grace...Drawing upon libraries and archives in five different countries, Martin’s work is a dazzling transnational history of ideas and institutions as well as a major contribution to our understanding of fascism and the Third Reich: Martin reveals how cultural initiatives unlock the political imagination of the interwar radical right."

The New Republic

"Martin’s illuminating book...adds a significant dimension to our understanding of how the Nazi and Fascist empires were constructed. [...] Martin unravels these multinational connections with clarity and precision, aided by research and reading in at least five European languages. [...] This story has been approached mostly, if at all, in individual national terms, but Martin has brought the whole Axis cultural project admirably into focus."

—Robert O. Paxton, in The New York Review of Books

 

Amazon / Amazon.de / Amazon.it / Adlibris (Sweden) / Bokus

Author interview podcast with New Books in History; listen here!

Chosen as Editor's pick in EuropeNow (January 2017)

REVIEWS:

Reviewed in The New York Review of Books (October 2017)

Reviewed in H-France (August 2017)

Reviewed in The New Republic (May 2017)

Reviewed in Michigan War Studies Review (May 2017)

Reviewed in Journal of Social History (April 2017)

Reviewed in Central European History (March 2017)

Reviewed in Dagens Nyheter (January 2017) (in Swedish)

Reviewed in the New Statesman (November 2016)

 

"Svensk film i Hitlers Europa: Nationell filmindustri och internationella nätverk"

in Maria Björkman, Patrik Lundell & Sven Widmalm (red.) De intellektuellas förräderi? (Stockholm: Arkiv, 2016)

This book chapter examines how the Swedish film industry navigated between two alternative efforts to create international film networks in the interwar period--one led by Hollywood, the other led by Nazi Germany. I focus on Sweden's participation in the International Film Chamber (IFC), founded by Nazi Germany in 1935, in order to explore what longer-term legacies can be ascribed to Swedish cooperation with the intellectual and cultural politics of Hitler's Germany.

Adlibris / Bokus

 

 

 
© Ad Meskens / Wikimedia Commons

© Ad Meskens / Wikimedia Commons

"'European Literature' in the Nazi New Order: The Cultural Politics of the European Writers' Union, 1941-3"

in Journal of Contemporary History, 48 (3): 486-508.

This article examines the European Writers' Union, founded by Nazi Germany with representatives of fifteen nations in October 1941, in the context of the history of the idea of European literature. It argues that this institution was a serious effort to re-order the international literary field into a European form, designed to help legitimate Nazi Germany's New Order Europe and to establish the cultural hegemony which German elites believed they alone deserved. Drawing on work by scholars of comparative literature and cultural sociology, this article sets the Writers' Union in the transnational history of the literary field in twentieth-century Europe in order to interpret the rhetorical, ideological and practical strategies of what could be called the "soft power" of Nazi Empire.


Book Chapters

Cinema and the Swastika: The International Expansion of Third Reich Cinema

"‘European Cinema for Europe!’ The International Film Chamber, 1935-42"

in Roel Vande Winkel and David Welch, eds., Cinema and the Swastika: The International Expansion of Third Reich Cinema (rev. ed., Houndsmill, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011): 25-41.

 

 

 

 

 

 
Donatello Among the Blackshirts: History and Modernity in the Visual Culture of Fascist Italy.jpg

Online

Poster for the 1943 French release of Die Große Liebe. Source: germanfilms.de

Poster for the 1943 French release of Die Große Liebe. Source: germanfilms.de

"Zarah Leander and the Dream of a (Nazi) European Cinema"

"Here was an actress with the potential not just to replace Marlene Dietrich—whose 1930 departure for Hollywood had been a lasting blow to the German industry—but to be a new Garbo. And, if the Germans could keep her from running off to Hollywood, she could be Germany’s European Garbo."

An essay on the European role of the Swedish actress and singer, on the blog of the International Association for Media and History.

 
The Café Griensteidl in Vienna, watercolour by Reinhold Voelkel, 1896. Photo by Getty

The Café Griensteidl in Vienna, watercolour by Reinhold Voelkel, 1896. Photo by Getty

"'European Culture' is an Invented Tradition"

An essay on the twentieth-century birth of the idea of 'European culture' in Aeon, the online magazine of ideas.

European intellectuals' "attachment to European distinctiveness led to an embrace and celebration of something else, something almost ineffable, that neither the US nor the USSR could ever claim: that was ‘European culture’."

El Dorado night club, Berlin pre-1933 (photo: Bundesarchiv Berlin)

El Dorado night club, Berlin pre-1933 (photo: Bundesarchiv Berlin)

"Cabarets Berlin" 

Historical essay in Uppsala stadsteater program book, 2014 (in Swedish)

This essay offers historical context for viewers of the Uppsala city theater company's production of the musical Cabaret.